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Working Capital Cycle (WCC)

Definition - What does Working Capital Cycle (WCC) mean?

The working capital cycle (WCC) is the amount of time it takes to turn the net current assets and current liabilities into cash. The longer the cycle is, the longer a business is tying up capital in its working capital without earning a return on it. Therefore, companies strive to reduce its working capital cycle by collecting receivables quicker or sometimes stretching accounts payable.

Divestopedia explains Working Capital Cycle (WCC)

A positive working capital cycle balances incoming and outgoing payments to minimize net working capital and maximize free cash flow. For example, a company that pays its suppliers in 30 days but takes 60 days to collect its receivables has a working capital cycle of 30 days. This 30-day cycle usually needs to be funded through a bank operating line, and the interest on this financing is a carrying cost that reduces the company's profitability. Growing businesses require cash, and being able to free up cash by shortening the working capital cycle is the most inexpensive way to grow. Sophisticated buyers review closely a target's working capital cycle because it provides them with an idea of the management's effectiveness at managing their balance sheet and generating free cash flow.

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    Equicapita's model is to acquire established, private small and medium sized enterprises (“SMEs”) located primarily in Western Canada.
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