Q&A With Our Experts

Divestopedia has assembled some of the industry's top advisors to answer anything and everything related to the sale of a business.

Featured Experts

Jamie Grant

 

Jamie Grant is the Co-founder and Managing Director at Mirus Capital Advisors. He is responsible for negotiating, structuring, valuing and closing mergers and acquisitions, financings, restructurings and leveraged buy-outs. Jamie has advised on more than 75 engagements and has over 16+ years in the industry.

Clinton Lee

 

Clinton is the founder of The Exit Firm, a UK M&A consultancy that advises business owners on their exit options and connects them with the right professional expertise to help them achieve their exit goals.Prior to starting this consultancy, Clinton’s entrepreneurial career spanned over three decades and included building, buying and selling of over two dozen businesses.Now based in the UK, Clinton originally studied accountancy in India as an undergraduate and attended Virginia Tech in the USA for an MBA in finance.Areas of Expertise: UK-based private companies with turnover of up to £10M.

Alan Chettiar

 

Alan Chettiar leads FirePower Capital’s Investment Banking team in all its engagements and sets its strategic direction. He brings over a decade of experience in venture capital (debt and equity) and private equity. Alan holds an MBA from the Ted Rogers School of Management, a JD from Dalhousie University, and a Bachelor of Commerce from St. Mary’s University. He is registered as a CIM by the Canadian Securities Institute.

Q&As

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Look 10 years ago operating partners, not in the payroll, but off the payroll, maybe on portfolio company payroll, was the trend. That was the differentiator. That was very commonplace but really...
100%. It's a case where that perception could be altered a little bit. Take the deal marketing example you mentioned. Oftentimes the investment bankers are struggling to gather information and...
Answered by: Ben Collins
Director of Product Marketing and Strategy
I think one of the hesitations may be any change to existing, or more traditional, processes. There's general trepidation amongst M&A practitioners to fix something that they don't...
Answered by: Ben Collins
Director of Product Marketing and Strategy
I think it's two things. So, you’ve got the sale-side and the buy-side. Two sides of the same coin with the M&A process. On the sale-side, we’re seeing a lot of bankers looking...
Answered by: Ben Collins
Director of Product Marketing and Strategy
It’s hard to pick just one area, but I think, first and foremost, it comes down to speed, so in this environment — which remains competitive for attractive assets — it’s...
Answered by: Ben Collins
Director of Product Marketing and Strategy
Note: This content originally appeared in T/A Economics and has been published here with permission.The International Valuation Standards Council (IVSC) provided insight in how to deal with valuation...
Answered by: Kenny Van Tulder
Senior Manager
I am of the opinion that in order to maximize value in the sale of a mid-market business, a widely-marketed sale process should be conducted. This means getting a no-names teaser to as many qualified...
Answered by: John Carvalho
President, Divestopedia Inc.
There are plenty of articles answering the question: how long does it take to sell a business? The typical response is that it takes about 8 to 12 months to appropriately prepare, plan and execute...
Answered by: John Carvalho
President, Divestopedia Inc.
Receiving consideration other than cash is not uncommon. In fact, it is very rare that vendors receive all cash for their business. Different forms of non-cash consideration include a seller's note,...
Answered by: John Carvalho
President, Divestopedia Inc.
There are generally two reasons companies spend money on capital expenditures (capex): to grow the business, and to maintain the business. Once a company determines it needs to make a capex...
A private equity group has a lot of flexibility typically in how they collect fees or harvest value from a company in which they are invested. The form and structure of what those economics looks...
Private equity groups have a broad range of interests based on their investment strategy and the mandates they have been given by their investors of which types of businesses to invest in. These...
The key difference between a strategic buyer and a financial buyer is that a strategic buyer is typically going to be buying all of your company. There are a couple of differences once this happens...
There aren't many proprietary tools that private equity groups can use to create value. Business management, sales, and marketing strategy have been well researched and published in which the best...
When the entrepreneur has decided to work with the private equity group, and they enter into a contract to close the deal, it will have to undergo a due diligence process that can be quite intensive...
That’s a good question. A business owner, upon entering into a relationship with a private equity group, is going to experience a range of things because they are really entering into a new business...
There are probably too many things to list that are really important for a business owner to understand about their agreements and documents with a private equity group. It is very important for the...
I’ll break it into two broad categories and I’ll give the underlying assumption. The underlying assumption is that at some point, all deals will come down to certain metrics. In the world that we...
Price and terms get locked down in an LOI, but they tend to get locked down on a "to be confirmed" by the due diligence phases. So if I’m on the buy side and I get some unexpected due diligence...
To set the context of my answer, many lower mid-market companies have a Board of Directors, but the board is made up of someone's mother and brother who have never done anything except vote in his...
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